I discovered

A little history…

The Church of Saint Christophe in Morillon Village

The Church of Saint Christophe in Morillon Village

There can be doubt that Morillon is the land of the “morilles”, the flavoursome and slightly rough oblong mushrooms found in late spring under certain trees in the orchard. On this, all mushroom pickers agree, led by the Genevois, yet without revealing the places of their great finds.

Ancient texts say nothing on the subject: this silence, shown by the absence of any visual clue on arms, shields or stamps, leaves room for wide interpretation. At first, we spoke of the Valley of the “Certous”, corresponding to modern-day Haut-Giffre. In archival documents, mention is made of “Merello”, “Morellons” and then “Morillion”…

In 1316, the recognition of certain fiefdoms alludes to the subject of Morellon. The foundation deed of the chapel of St. Christophe of 27 July 1457 places it on the Crest of Morillion…

Toponymy teaches us that the root word “mor” (also found in the forms “mour”, “mur”, etc.) means “piece of stone, rocky mound”: Morillon would therefore mean “village built on a stony place”. This makes sense in a historical perspective, as a landslide has separated an extensive section from the left side of the Giffre, which is clearly visible at the base of the plain just below the modern-day village. Similarly, there are villages or places that are homonyms: Montriond (between Morzine and Avoriaz), Morion (above Courchevel), recalling that in mountainous towns, the stone is a permanent aspect, which also dictates place names and organises human life.

Excerpt from the book (currently out of print) “Morillon, Petite chronique des jours” (Morillon, Brief Chronicle of Days) by Jean-François Tanghe.